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viernes, noviembre 09, 2012

Philip Roth Stops Writing

According to The New York Times Philip Roth says he's done writing.

That's sad. Nemesis will be his last novel.

The story:

Philip Roth has hinted about retirement before, but he recently said definitively that he’s done writing books. Mr. Roth, 79, the author of 26 novels and a perennial contender for the Nobel Prize in Literature, made the statement in an interview with the French magazine Les InRocks, according to a translation published in Salon.

“To tell you the truth, I’m done,” Mr. Roth told the magazine. “‘Nemesis’ will be my last book.”

“I do not want to read, to write more,” Mr. Roth said in the interview, according to Salon. “I have dedicated my life to the novel: I studied, I taught, I wrote and I read. With the exclusion of almost everything else. Enough is enough! I no longer feel this fanaticism to write that I have experienced in my life.”

And so one of Weequahic's most creative sons fades to silence.

The Times says,

Mr. Roth will now have more time to clear up interpretations about his work (as he did earlier this year in an open letter to Wikipedia) and to cooperate with his recently named biographer, Blake Bailey.

Hah. Did anybody ask him his plans?

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1 Comments:

Blogger david seth michaels said...

Today's NY times covered Philip Roth's stopping writing. In it you will find this:

“I sat around for a month or two trying to think of something else and I thought, ‘Maybe it’s over, maybe it’s over,’ ” he said. “I gave myself a dose of fictional juice by rereading writers I hadn’t read in 50 years and who had meant quite a lot when I read them. I read Dostoevsky, I read Conrad — two or three books by each. I read Turgenev, two of the greatest short stories ever written, ‘First Love’ and ‘The Torrents of Spring.’ ” He also reread Faulkner and Hemingway.

“And then I decided to reread my own books,” Mr. Roth went on, “and I began from the last book forward, casting a cold eye. And I thought, ‘You did all right.’ But when I got to ‘Portnoy’ ” — “Portnoy’s Complaint,” published in 1969 — “I had lost interest, and I didn’t read the first four books.”

“So I read all that great stuff,” he added, “and then I read my own and I knew I wasn’t going to get another good idea, or if I did, I’d have to slave over it.”

7:59 p. m.  

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